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More ways to get Braingle...

They're Alike

These brain teasers rely on your ability to recognize groups of common attributes. For each of these puzzles you'll need to figure out why the words or letters are grouped as they are. Sometimes you will be asked to pick the odd-one-out or to place a new word into the correct group.

 

Puzzle ID:#39137
Fun:*** (2.89)
Difficulty:** (1.6)
Category:Group
Submitted By:BlackBeltAus***

 

 

 



What do all the words in this list have in common?

Lead
Sow
Bass
Wind
Tear
Object





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Comments

BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

My fifth brain teaser! I hope you all enjoy!
King_of_Smart*
Nov 10, 2007

Good one!
BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

Thanks!
Mad-AdeAhu*
Nov 10, 2007

what is the different pronunciation of "object"?
BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

1. An item
2. You object something... like in court, someone could say "I object!"

Mad-AdeAhu*
Nov 10, 2007

yes, but what is the different pronunciation, not meaning
BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

For the first definition, you stress more on the first syllable.

ob-jikt or ob-jekt (stressing the "OB")



For the second, you put stress on the second syllable.

uhb-jekt (stressing "JEKT")
Mad-AdeAhu*
Nov 10, 2007

huh? what nonesense. not according to the audio pronunciation on Dictionary.com they are both the same and I would say them the same too.
BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

Actually I was just on dictionary.com, and saw the pronunciations for the words. I don't know how they pronounced it in the audio, but the text pronunciation is different.
Mad-AdeAhu*
Nov 10, 2007

do you pronounce them differently?
BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

Yes.
Mad-AdeAhu*
Nov 10, 2007

ok, I will believe you
BlackBeltAus
Nov 10, 2007

Thanks.
doglc*us
Nov 10, 2007

i don't get it maybe i'll do it again and see if i get it then
saradoveus*
Nov 12, 2007

My mom likes these kinds of teasers.
bookworm91**
Nov 12, 2007

Good one! I should have got it, since I went through them and was like, "Now does he mean 'lead' or 'lead'?" HAHA. I'm so dense.
tpg76us*
Nov 14, 2007

I had first thought the answer was that each word had separate and distinct uses as a noun, AND as a verb - perhaps a special case of what you described.

But on second read, "bass" wouldn't fit that (both meanings are nouns). However if the entry were changed to its homonym, "base", my answer would fit! Check it out - it works (then) for every entry, with this one (minor!) substitution!

Thanks.
dutchymonster*en**
Nov 16, 2007

I'm with Ade on the Object one - I'd pronounce them the same too. - maybe it's one of them UK/US things!
lukeschettAus*
Dec 05, 2007

Very nice.
BarticusAus*
Dec 23, 2007

I got it easily, but I also say "object" doesn't really fit. It's pronounced with stress on the first syllable as a noun and second syllable as a verb, but that's because it stills follows Old English stress pattern. The same would apply to "record". However "entrance" would be a good one, because the noun and verb aren't related.
jimbooth019A*
Feb 07, 2009

Great teaser. Yes object and object have the accent on opposite sylables. The item object the accent is OB- ject, the term in court is ob-JECT.
thanks!!
teri12265us*
Feb 07, 2009

This was great because I never knew the term 'heteronym'. I knew that all the words had dual meanings and pronounciations. Thanks for teaching me something. Have a wonderful day!
teri12265us*
Feb 07, 2009

oops - pronunciation.

(I also agree with above - add record to the list)
avonmaAus*
Feb 07, 2009

Thanks. That was easy and fun! And I learned a new word - I didn't know what they were called.
Now. Did you all read the answer? Heteronyms are words which are spelled exactly the same way but have different pronunciations and different meanings.
Object, OB-ject, something that can be seen or felt
Object, ob-JECT, to oppose something
"different pronunciations and different meanings"
Got it, now?
precious1026Aus*
Feb 07, 2009

I missed the entire point. It was not until I read your comments that I understood the Teaser, which by the way, was Great. I love this teaser. I will make it a favorite. Your Explanation was perfect.
bradon182001*us*
Feb 07, 2009

This was a really good teaser. I realized that lead could be either lead or lead (I know you don't see any difference when they are written, but are two different words when you pronounce them) but I didn't pay any attention to the other words, so I didn't make that connection.I also never heard the word 'heteronym" so now I've learned something new today. thanks for posting.
auntiesisAus*
Feb 07, 2009

Heretonym is a new word for me. Thanks for a great teaser and a special thanks for a new word.
UptheHillA*
Feb 07, 2009

melzerhtus*
Feb 07, 2009

I still don't get it?
composer*
Feb 07, 2009

Tear has two different pronunciations?
Not around anywhere I've lived.
hockey0733
Feb 07, 2009

Tear - as in crying

Tear - as in ripped, torn
scallioAus*
Feb 08, 2009

Loved this teaser!

Thanks!
MikeGus*
Oct 06, 2011

I like it!
Babe*
Feb 07, 2012

Had no problem getting this one.
Good teaser. What is the problem with the person having trouble with the word object? Just say, "What is that object in your hand?' And then say, "I object to what you just said." that shoiuld clear it up.
spikethru4*au*
Feb 07, 2012

To those people who object to 'object' being an object in the list, the difference in pronunciation is subtle, but it is there. Good teaser; I got it easily but, like others, had never heard of the term 'heteronym', so thanks for that.
HABS2933Aca*
Feb 07, 2012

Easy-Peasy! We got this list of homophones in grade 2 or 3 when we started to take French in elementary school. (presumably to quell the complaints that French was difficult).

The Defence attorney had to "Object" to the "object" the DA was presenting in evidence".

I was not close enough to close the window.

There was a bass painted on the bass drum

There was too much wind to easily wind the kite in.

The bandage was wound around the wound.

The dove dove into the bush.

The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

It was time to present the present

The soldiers had to desert their dessert in the desert.

And on and on . . . good (though easy) teaeser!
doeheadAus*
Feb 07, 2012

With this old repeat, I bid everyone a final GOODBYE
gaylewolfAus*
Feb 07, 2012

This was a good puzzle and I learned a new word today too! Thanks to HABS and a few others before you who explained what the differences were in each word! Have a wonderful day, friends!
gaylewolfAus*
Feb 07, 2012

PS Bookworm from 2007 - I said the same thing you did!
asupmdr*
Feb 07, 2012

They also don't have the vowels, I or U, to be prefect. "I" say, they all have four letters, lest "U" object.
asupmdr*
Feb 07, 2012

They also don't have the vowels, I or U, to be perfect. "I" say, they all have four letters, lest "U" object.
phyllisa*us*
Feb 07, 2012

Goodbye, doehead! I liked this teaser and learned a new word.
jaycr*us*
Feb 07, 2012

I got this one, but, I can understand the confusion with pronunciation considering the global audience.
FatHeadAus*
Feb 07, 2012

Myself, I would have called them homophones, meaning different words that _sound alike_.

I wouldn't have thought of row, because I pronounce it "roh", meaning to pilot a boat, or a horizontal line of cells in a spreadsheet, among other things. "Row" to rhyme with "now" is something I've never heard of in American literature.
auntiesisAus*
Feb 07, 2012

Row that rhymes with now is used to denote a fight or spat.
I really liked this teaser since I used many of these examples when tutoring students.



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