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More ways to get Braingle...

Moonlight

Science brain teasers require understanding of the physical or biological world and the laws that govern it.

 

Puzzle ID:#40582
Fun:*** (2.24)
Difficulty:** (1.16)
Category:Science
Submitted By:cheesepieus****!

 

 

 



Several people were out in total darkness, except for the light of the full moon. Also, they were bathed in sunlight. How is this possible?




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Comments

cheesepieus*
Feb 19, 2008

For those who have a 5th grade science education this teaser was easy I hope . But those of you who are not smarter than a 5th grader .
3rd teaser ever
ttam007*
Feb 24, 2008

Saying that the moon's light really sunlight is like saying that my blue jeans radiate sunlight - I just don't buy it. The atoms on the moon actually absorb the sunlight and then emit the energy back out again. This is why we see the moon as white and the sun as yellow. If it was truly reflected, then it would also be yellow.
cheesepieus*
Feb 25, 2008

The point is that the light the moon gives off originates from the sun.
friesaregoodAus*
Apr 11, 2008

And here I thought that it was late in the day when the sun was still out but when the moon was visible. And then they would have the moonlight AND the sunlight shining on them. Oh well, I guess I was wrong.
j-meA*
Apr 24, 2008

For clarification:

"Saying that the moon's light really sunlight is like saying that my blue jeans radiate sunlight..."

Blue jeans reflect sunlight just like the moon does. This reflected sunlight is what we see.

"This is why we see the moon as white and the sun as yellow. If it was truly reflected, then it would also be yellow."

Visible light is a spectrum of colours, think of a rainbow. White light is a combination of all of these colours (sunlight is white, I think it's the earth's atmosphere that gives the sun a yellow appearance). When sunlight hits an object some of this light is absorbed by the object and some of it is reflected back from the object. It is the light that isn't absorbed but that is reflected back that we end up seeing. So blue jeans will absorb all visible light except blue which ends up getting reflected - hence the jeans appear blue.

I hope that clears things up.
cheesepieus*
Apr 24, 2008

Thank you very much for the thorough explanation
IQ_masterAsg
May 05, 2008

The sun is white, like all other stars i think.
cheesepieus*
May 05, 2008

Red Giants are an orange and red mix. Google the sun on images too.
Georgiau
May 24, 2008

For the clearup: the sun is yellow. It turns different colours according to the temperature. It'll go red eventually.

Anyway, I like this brainteaser, it's fairly simple. And best of all, I got the answer first go!!!
pn_16A*
May 29, 2008

I got it.. Nice teaser
kunjuAin*
Jun 18, 2008

I GOT IT
here2A*
Dec 13, 2008

very nice. It took me a second, but I got it.
BatteryAen*
Jan 21, 2009

Wouldn't really say they were 'bathed' in sunlight
(user deleted)
Mar 18, 2009

True that moonlight is reflected sunlight.
But it is NOT the same type of light. The reflection polarizes the moonlight.
So the "blue jeans" example is not off the mark.
PaladinAus*
Apr 09, 2009

Except that the "blue jeans" could be illuminated by any light source... including incandescent light bulbs.
princess2007A*
Mar 09, 2011

To the person above me, I'm sure if we strung up a bunch of incandescent bulbs on the moon, it would illuminate it too. Just trying to say that the first person actually had a point. You just can't call moonlight reflected sunlight.
netjunkie9
Aug 04, 2011

I think what many are saying is that the term "sunlight" implies direct rays which differ from those reflected off the surface of the moon. Like many puzzles here this is semantics, not science.



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