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How do I get the chocolate?

AuthorMessage
celticherotus

Posts: 791

new Posted: 11:01PM May 29, 2011

Just knock out the dude, take his wallet and chocolate,

I'm just an ordinary average guy with nothing to lose.
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Mogmatt16Ava

Posts: 321

new Posted: 08:27PM Jun 25, 2011

"When my hand is over the box with the chocolate, will the answer to the question "Is the chocolate in this box?" be the same as the answer to this question?" asked while you move your hand between the three boxes. If he can only answer honestly, then he can't answer unless your hand is over the box. That's the best answer I can make without cheating the spirit of the question. I'm fairly certain a purely logical answer (a question truly answerable with only Yes or No) is impossible, since the response would divide the boxes into two groups, and you could never be certain between the group with two boxes.

Going on nine years.
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Life_Sucks*us

Posts: 2530

new Posted: 04:14AM Jul 13, 2011

bpkeller wrote:
...you know, I'm hating my tendencies to overthink things more and more.
That's not always bad.


the air is full of dust
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Mathgeek007tca

Pi Guy
Posts: 1435


new Posted: 07:03AM Jul 13, 2011

grungy49 wrote:
I have a teaser very similar to this that I submitted a while ago. Write 1, 2, 3 on each of the boxes, and then tell the man I am thinking of either 1.5 or 2.5. Is the chocolate in the box that has a number greater than mine? If he says yes, it is in box 3. If he says no, it is in box 1. If he can't answer, it's in box 2.


I think that's right. Good job.


Parents are supposed to "protect" their kids, but there's a real distinction between protection and unrealistically keeping children away from reality. - Life_Sucks --- One of my teasers was featured as the Teaser of the Day! :D Sept. 18 2011 :D YAY!
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Life_Sucks*us

Posts: 2530

new Posted: 01:47PM Jul 13, 2011

celtichero wrote:
Just knock out the dude, take his wallet and chocolate,
I like this answer better.


the air is full of dust
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Mathgeek007tca

Pi Guy
Posts: 1435


new Posted: 07:53PM Jul 13, 2011

BloodMoon wrote:
It can't be positive OR negative...


Then it would be a no. It's not positive.


Parents are supposed to "protect" their kids, but there's a real distinction between protection and unrealistically keeping children away from reality. - Life_Sucks --- One of my teasers was featured as the Teaser of the Day! :D Sept. 18 2011 :D YAY!
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dangerouspie101tus

Deepy the Soul Mushroom
Posts: 4175


new Posted: 02:24PM Jun 16, 2012

WELL, it never said you could not look under the boxes. Ask him, is the chocolate in this box while pointing to one of the boxes, and if he sayd yes, you have acivied your goal. if it's a no, just look under the boxes. it never said you could not.

Also, I lit your fridge on fire. It was upsetting me.
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BrainyRoxtpk

Posts: 1

new Posted: 03:14PM May 30, 2013

I love .......MEOkay, so here goes. It's never mentioned that the boxes are big. In these sorts of games, shuffling of boxes is allowed. ask him if you could do it, if he says yes then while you're moving it check which one requires the most force or is more heavy. That's the chocolate bar one. If he says no, then just guess. If you guess wrong, who cares? you aren't getting a reward for this, are you? If you really want chocolate, then go and buy one!


---This message was edited on 03:16PM May 30, 2013---
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Ihmisen*

Posts: 254

new Posted: 02:44AM Jun 2, 2013

Note at the start of the thread:
How can you figure out which box the chocolate is in for SURE from asking only one question?


It depends on your perception of finger- 4

Not yes/no.

Just open all three boxes, ask the man a really personal question, and eat the chocolate bar while he answers.

Actions are not questions.

you should have felt the weight and shifting of the chocolate bar as you turned it earlier

No. Otherwise one would turn all three and be done with it. Not a question.

, a positive number?

1/0 and 1/-1 are both not positive.

nothing if it is in the right-most box

Yes and no do not include nothing.

It isn't mentioned anywhere in the question that there are tops on the cardboard boxes

It also isn't said there isn't a velocioraptor in the room. It's called a reasonable assumption.

If he can't answer, it's in box 2.

That's not yes or no.

It's binary logic. Christ.

It doesn't say anywhere that you can't open them.

Actually it does. See the topmost quote of this post.

"When my hand is over the box with the chocolate, will the answer to the question "Is the chocolate in this box?" be the same as the answer to this question?" asked while you move your hand between the three boxes. If he can only answer honestly, then he can't answer unless your hand is over the box. That's the best answer I can make without cheating the spirit of the question. I'm fairly certain a purely logical answer (a question truly answerable with only Yes or No) is impossible, since the response would divide the boxes into two groups, and you could never be certain between the group with two boxes.

It breaks the obviously intended binarism of the question, but it does at least not break the explicit rules outlined.

WELL, it never said you could not look under the boxes. Ask him, is the chocolate in this box while pointing to one of the boxes, and if he sayd yes, you have acivied your goal. if it's a no, just look under the boxes. it never said you could not.

Yes it did. You are retarded.

If he says no, then just guess. If you guess wrong, who cares?

First post. Correct answer ensures 100% probability.



In the truest sense, this puzzle is unsolvable. The options are:
In box one
In box two
In box three

In a question to identify one, at least three options must be present. However, the original post mandates a two option question. Thus, without destroying the integrity of the problem, it is not possible. Possible binary answers include.
Either in 1 or 2
Either in 2 or 3
Either in 1 or 3

None of these satisfy the need to be 100% sure.
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AwwwSweet

Posts: 217

new Posted: 10:26PM Jun 18, 2013

Schrödinger's chocolate bar.

The riddle does not say whether you can provide instruction, manipulate the boxes in any way, or whether or not the man at the table even has pre-knowledge of which box has the chocolate bar. So, avoiding all the assumptions above, the question is:

Does the chocolate bar exist in one of the boxes without knowledge of the other two boxes?

Or, slightly simplified...

Can the chocolate bar exist outside the box?


---This message was edited on 10:40PM Jun 18, 2013---

"The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery." - Anais Nin
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Steve1973Aus

Posts: 822

new Posted: 01:49AM Jun 19, 2013

bpkeller wrote:
I can't figure out this one and it's been bugging me. Can someone help?

There is a man sitting at a table with three cardboard boxes in front of him, and there is a bar of chocolate under one of them. You can ask him any yes or no question, and he will answer honestly, but you may only ask one question. How can you figure out which box the chocolate is in for SURE from asking only one question?


So this guy only gives Yes/No answers. We can only ask him 1 question. Here's the solution:

"I'm going to call these boxes, Box 1, Box 2, and Box 3, so if the chocolate is in Box 1 or 2, please tell me YES, but if the chocolate is in box 2 or 3, please tell me NO."

Now, if he answers honestly:
If the chocolate is in Box 1, he'll say "YES"
If in Box 3, he'll say "NO"
If in Box 2, he'll say "YES-NO"


---This message was edited on 01:49AM Jun 19, 2013---

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AwwwSweet

Posts: 217

new Posted: 09:32AM Jun 19, 2013

Well, first of all it isn't a question. Secondly, he cannot answer "no" if the chocolate bar is in box 2 or 3 because that would be a false answer. It doesn't matter if you instruct him differently, he has to answer honestly. Additionally, compound questions are still multiple questions, even if you try to couch them in a single sentence.

The paradox of Schrödinger's chocolate bar (bottom of pg 3) solves these issues, and all the other issues/concerns brought up previously in this topic.


---This message was edited on 09:33AM Jun 19, 2013---

"The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery." - Anais Nin
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Thekid4t

Posts: 370

new Posted: 02:42PM Jun 20, 2013

Ihmisen's quote was wrong. I have written my reactions in green. Here we go.

Ihmisen wrote:
Note at the start of the thread:
How can you figure out which box the chocolate is in for SURE from asking only one question?
Okay, fine. I'm with you so far.

It depends on your perception of finger- 4

Not yes/no. I agree with this.

Just open all three boxes, ask the man a really personal question, and eat the chocolate bar while he answers.

Actions are not questions. I think this was a joke. Besides, it does say "ask him a personal QUESTION. You ask a question and still be SURE which box it is in.

you should have felt the weight and shifting of the chocolate bar as you turned it earlier

No. Otherwise one would turn all three and be done with it. Not a question. But you could still ask a question such as "What is four plus five" and then turn all three and be done with it.

, a positive number?

1/0 and 1/-1 are both not positive. Okay, fine. I'll give you that one.

nothing if it is in the right-most box

Yes and no do not include nothing. Again, I'll give you that one.

It isn't mentioned anywhere in the question that there are tops on the cardboard boxes

It also isn't said there isn't a velocioraptor in the room. It's called a reasonable assumption. I could probably give a long argument about this, so I think it would be best if we all move on.

If he can't answer, it's in box 2.

That's not yes or no. Fine.

It's binary logic. Christ.

It doesn't say anywhere that you can't open them.

Actually it does. See the topmost quote of this post. Um, where exactly does it say in the topmost quote (Or in the original post, for that matter) that you can't open them.

"When my hand is over the box with the chocolate, will the answer to the question "Is the chocolate in this box?" be the same as the answer to this question?" asked while you move your hand between the three boxes. If he can only answer honestly, then he can't answer unless your hand is over the box. That's the best answer I can make without cheating the spirit of the question. I'm fairly certain a purely logical answer (a question truly answerable with only Yes or No) is impossible, since the response would divide the boxes into two groups, and you could never be certain between the group with two boxes.

It breaks the obviously intended binarism of the question, but it does at least not break the explicit rules outlined. Then it is valid. Look at the trick section of this website's teasers.

WELL, it never said you could not look under the boxes. Ask him, is the chocolate in this box while pointing to one of the boxes, and if he sayd yes, you have acivied your goal. if it's a no, just look under the boxes. it never said you could not.

Yes it did. You are retarded. Again, it never says so. Also, please see this site.

If he says no, then just guess. If you guess wrong, who cares?

First post. Correct answer ensures 100% probability. Actually, it says above that you need to be SURE.



In the truest sense, this puzzle is unsolvable. The options are:
In box one
In box two
In box three

In a question to identify one, at least three options must be present. However, the original post mandates a two option question. Thus, without destroying the integrity of the problem, it is not possible. Possible binary answers include.
Either in 1 or 2
Either in 2 or 3
Either in 1 or 3

None of these satisfy the need to be 100% sure.


My theory is that the original poster got it from a troll. Either that or she made it up to see what we could come up with.


Who needs a witty signature anyway?
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AwwwSweet

Posts: 217

new Posted: 02:51PM Jun 20, 2013

Thekid4 wrote:
My theory is that the original poster got it from a troll. Either that or she made it up to see what we could come up with.


Hmm. I was hoping people would at least read and try to break the Schrödinger's chocolate bar solution. Of course, you have to know about Schrödinger's cat to really get it.


"The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery." - Anais Nin
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Thekid4t

Posts: 370

new Posted: 02:54PM Jun 20, 2013

Of course I know about that poor man's cat! (And by the way, I didn't just look it up. I knew about it all along.)

Why do I say "that poor man"? Because his cat never died


---This message was edited on 02:54PM Jun 20, 2013---

Who needs a witty signature anyway?
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AwwwSweet

Posts: 217

new Posted: 03:03PM Jun 20, 2013

Hehe, cute with the sneaky never.

Maybe I need to go over the solution that results from the question.

Does the chocolate bar exist in one of the boxes without knowledge of the other two boxes?

The man across the table has to answer honestly, and therefore has to see the chocolate bar in order to answer either yes or no. He must open the box with the chocolate bar and confirm that it does exist while looking at it, making it very obvious which box has the chocolate. Let's say he doesn't know at the start which one of the boxes might hold the chocolate (some crazy dude put you guys in the room and made you play out his evil game). Well, it doesn't matter if he opens all three boxes first. He cannot have knowledge of the other two boxes when he confirms the chocolate still exists, so you will still know which box holds the chocolate when he confirms it. In fact, with this question/answer pair, you could have 100 boxes and still find the/a chocolate bar with only this one question... assuming it does actually exist.


"The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery." - Anais Nin
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Steve1973Aus

Posts: 822

new Posted: 10:22AM Jul 3, 2013

AwwwSweet wrote:
Well, first of all it isn't a question. Secondly, he cannot answer "no" if the chocolate bar is in box 2 or 3 because that would be a false answer. It doesn't matter if you instruct him differently, he has to answer honestly. Additionally, compound questions are still multiple questions, even if you try to couch them in a single sentence.

The paradox of Schrödinger's chocolate bar (bottom of pg 3) solves these issues, and all the other issues/concerns brought up previously in this topic.


" Using the numbers one to represent the box on the left, two to prepesent the box in the middle, and four to represent the box on the right, what is the SUM of the the numbers representing the boxes that don't contain the chocolate."

If in the left box, then he'd answer 6. In the middle, he'd answer 5. In the right box, he'd answer 3.

His answer now tells us for certainty where the chocolate is. (And I doubt anyone would fail to agree that this is a single question, or say that it'd be invalid for whatever reason.)

I is now eatting chocolate.


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AwwwSweet

Posts: 217

new Posted: 11:18AM Jul 3, 2013

First, the riddle states it must be a yes/no question, which "what is the sum" is not.

Second, while the riddle states there is a man at the table, it does not state whether or not he knows where the chocolate is located. Not knowing whether the man at the table even knows where the chocolate bar is located is the basis for ruling out pretty much every other question that could be asked. That variable must be taken into account within any question just as much as the three boxes.

I am more than happy to concede that the riddle could be written incorrectly, but with how it IS written the possibility remains that he does not know and would remain silent or honestly answer, "I cannot answer the question." Additionally, we must know with certainty that the question will tell us where the chocolate is, so we cannot assume he knows the chocolate's location when we have not been informed that he has that knowledge.

I don't mean to be a pain, lol, but my fiance and I spent about 2 hours one night mulling over this and constantly ruling out each other's ideas because the riddle is worded so specifically. I would be insanely curious to find another solution, and to be perfectly honest am a bit disappointed that there hasn't been more discussion about this one. Even the Schrödinger's chocolate solution has to be worded very carefully to not assume the man knows, to not allow him to just say "no", and to force him to open the boxes. He cannot say the chocolate bar does not exist, nor can he say it does exist, until he has verified it.


---This message was edited on 11:23AM Jul 3, 2013---

"The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery." - Anais Nin
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Mathgeek007tca

Pi Guy
Posts: 1435


new Posted: 07:30PM Jul 6, 2013

If the bar is in Box 1, say yes. If it's in Box 2, say no. If it's in Box 3, say nothing.

Parents are supposed to "protect" their kids, but there's a real distinction between protection and unrealistically keeping children away from reality. - Life_Sucks --- One of my teasers was featured as the Teaser of the Day! :D Sept. 18 2011 :D YAY!
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AwwwSweet

Posts: 217

new Posted: 10:58PM Jul 6, 2013

This has already been addressed.
1. Cheeky but that is A) not a question, and B) goes directly against what we all know to be a yes/no questions.
2. He cannot answer no for a box the chocolate is in because he must answer honestly.
3. You cannot assume the man knows which box the chocolate is in because the riddle never states he does.


"The possession of knowledge does not kill the sense of wonder and mystery. There is always more mystery." - Anais Nin
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