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Mentalrobics™

You exercise your body to stay physically in shape, so why shouldn't you exercise your brain to stay mentally fit? With these daily exercises you will learn how to flex your mind, improve your creativity and boost your memory. As with any exercise, repetition is necessary for you to see improvement, so pick your favorite exercises from our daily suggestions and repeat them as desired. Try to do some mentalrobics every single day!

The next time you are going to perform a task such as walking the dog, doing the laundry, or cleaning the dishes, put some earplugs in and do the activity without your sense of hearing. This will force you to use your other senses to complete the task, which will cause new associations to be formed. In addition, this will give your senses of smell and touch a chance to help out. Pay attention to how much information you usually get from hearing and what parts of the task are difficult without sound.

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Most of us go through our daily lives with fairly fixed routines. We get up, get dressed, eat breakfast, and drive to work the same way every day. This isn't necessarily bad because it allows our brains to slowly speed up to meet the day, but it also doesn't give our brains any exercise. Since these routine tasks are carried out almost subconsciously, the brain uses almost no energy and makes no new associations or neural connections.

Even activities like doing the laundry or walking the dog can be so routine that you hardly even think about doing them. Each activity is a chance to give your brain some exercise and get it actually thinking. Try to add some surprise or novelty into daily activities. For example, drive to work using a different route. This will prevent you from going on auto-pilot and getting to work without thinking about how you got there. The new path will provide new and interesting things to see which will stimulate your mind and make new associations.

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Try doing something that you don't normally do with your nondominant hand. Try brushing your teeth, eating lunch, dialing the telephone, or flipping a coin. By doing this exercise, you are giving the opposite side of your brain a chance to perform this activity. A right-handed person will always be using the left side of their brain and the other side will never get a chance to learn how to do certain activities. Allowing the nondominate side of the brain to do activities it doesn't normally do will quickly create all sorts of new associations in that part of the mind. This is an easy exercise and it has excellent results.

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Previously we learned how the mind makes associations between all the different sensory inputs as well as emotional states and social triggers. You can use this to your advantage when you want to be sure to remember something. Most people rely almost exclusively on their senses of sight and hearing. Try to get your sense of smell, touch, or taste into the memory, or pay attention to your emotional state. A memory that involves four senses will be much stronger than a memory that involves only two. The more associations you have for a particular memory, the more protection you have against losing it, and the more ways you will have to remember it later.

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Most people have heard of Pavlov's dog. Pavlov would ring a bell every time he fed his dog. Eventually, the dog would start salivating after hearing the bell, even if no food was in sight. This experiment shows how the dog's mind made an association between hearing and taste. This happens in humans too. The brain automatically makes associations between the five senses, in addition to emotional or social triggers. Once these associations are created, they can be recalled simply by experiencing one of the original inputs. In the dog's case, a sound triggers a memory about taste. Certainly you have had the experience where a smell, a flavor, or a sound has brought up a memory from your childhood.

In order for us to remember a new fact, it must be associated with one of the 7 different inputs described above. Each different sensory input causes different connections between neurons in the cerebral cortex, and the more inputs you have, the stronger your memory of that fact will be.

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