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Mentalrobics™

You exercise your body to stay physically in shape, so why shouldn't you exercise your brain to stay mentally fit? With these daily exercises you will learn how to flex your mind, improve your creativity and boost your memory. As with any exercise, repetition is necessary for you to see improvement, so pick your favorite exercises from our daily suggestions and repeat them as desired. Try to do some mentalrobics every single day!

If you aren't taking notes, then you might want to start. Note taking has been proven to be a highly effective way to learn and remember material. When you take notes, you put the information into your own words. This "translation" makes a huge difference to your brain, which can now more easily digest the material.

Additionally, when you take notes you are giving yourself a way to review the information later. It is very unlikely that you will be able to remember everything the first time you hear it. When you forget something and you don't have notes, then it's going to be difficult to relearn it.

You don't have to write down every little fact in a lecture or chapter of a book. Just write down the key facts and any information that you find unusual or interesting. Notes are not meant to replace the primary information; they are simply an aid to jog your memory.

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No matter how well you learn something, if you never access that information you will probably forget it. If you want to remember something, you need to review it from time to time to keep it fresh in your mind.

Review can also be very helpful immediately after learning something, because it can help solidify the important facts and make it easier for the brain to identify what to remember. You can use this to your advantage by making sure that you set aside some time at the end of a study session to review what you have learned. Just going over the main facts in your mind will be very helpful. You might also consider doing this after a class lecture. Take a few minutes to review your notes and go over the instructor's main points.

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Have you ever been introduced to someone and then forgotten their name a minute later? Here's a little tip to help you remember. When you are introduced, make an effort to repeat their name out loud.

For example:
"It's nice to meet you, Bruce. My name is..." or
"My sister's name is Karin too!"

By just saying their name out loud, you will be reinforcing it in your memory and it will be much more difficult to forget. If you can link it to someone else that you know (like your sister in the above example), you will have one more way to help you remember.

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Semantic memory refers to the memory of meanings and knowledge. For example, semantic memory would be used to remember your mother's birthday. The location of semantic memory in the brain is still debated, but many scientists believe that semantic memory is widely distributed across the entire brain.

Semantic memory is what is most often emphasized in schoolwork. The student is often required to memorize facts for later recall. It is interesting to note that semantic memory requires repetition whereas episodic memory is by definition the memory of a one-time event.

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Episodic memory is the memory of the time, place and emotional state of events that you experienced. The formation of episodic memories is closely tied to the hippocampus. Without the hippocampus, you would not be able to remember events that you experienced, although you might still be able to use procedural memory to learn new tasks.

It is believed that the hippocampus stores episodic memories for a short time, after which they are consolidated into the cortex. Many researchers believe that episodic memories are transformed into semantic memories over time. This would explain why old memories are often recalled as a kind of pre-written story instead of as a memory of the actual event.

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