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Apt Anagram

Language brain teasers are those that involve the English language. You need to think about and manipulate words and letters.

 

Puzzle ID:#24044
Fun:*** (2.63)
Difficulty:*** (3.04)
Category:Language
Submitted By:piers*gb****
Corrected By:boodler

 

 

 



What is an apt anagram for Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott?




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Comments

Cheerleader_09***
Jun 28, 2005

I seriously don't get this one!!!
piers*gb*
Jun 28, 2005

If you scramble the letters in "Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott" you get the phrase "A novel by a Scottish writer"
DancAllNiteLong**
Jun 28, 2005

Honestly, I did NOT know what the heck and "apt anagram" was. Sorry!
piers*gb*
Jun 29, 2005

I'm sorry to hear that you didn't understand it. Did you not know what apt meant or what anagram meant or what both of them meant?
Question_MarkAsx*
Jul 03, 2005

I'm Scottish. I should of got that one.
DancAllNiteLong**
Jul 03, 2005

I didn't understand both words TOGETHER, I've done teasers like this before, but they've just been like "scramble the letters to make a new phrase!" (I'm only in 8th grade.)
tamjpAus*
Jul 07, 2005

Truly Brilliant!
smarty_blondy*ro*
Oct 02, 2005

Good one, similar to the inapt one. Keep up the good job.
mathgrantAus*
Jan 25, 2009

As presented, this puzzle is unfairly hard and relatively unrewarding to solve, if it can, in fact, be solved in at all in this format. This is analogous to asking your solver to write a crossword clue for an answer phrase instead of vice versa. This should have been asked backwards, like the anagram puzzles that appear in The Enigma:

A NOVEL BY A SCOTTISH WRITER (*7 2 ^3 *6 *5)

* refers to proper nouns and adjectives (i.e., Ivanhoe and Walter Scott), and ^ refers to common (i.e. not proper) words that are capitalized solely because they're part of a title (i.e., Sir). Consider the following:

LATTES? IN HASTE, GO NW (*7, *10)

If I just gave you the name of the city, and asked you to find the anagram "LATTES? IN HASTE, GO NW", it'd be nigh impossible, and no fun. However, figuring out the city from its anagram is much more rewarding and fun.
piers*gb*
Jan 25, 2009

Mathgrant, I agree that that your way of writing the anagram is easier and funnier. Danceallnite, I'm sorry that you didn't understand what "apt anagram" meant. I didn't write the anagram - it was given to us by our teacher to solve when I was 9 years old and apparently is a well known old anagram. so I didn't think to change it to make it easier
doeheadAus*
Jan 25, 2009

auntiesisAus*
Jan 25, 2009

I was trying to anagram just the word Ivanhoe, which was fairly easy. I didn't understand that the whole phrase was to be anagrammed. It might have been easier if you put some quote marks around the words.
bradon182001*us*
Jan 25, 2009

I agree with auntiesis. I needed more direction but thanks for posting.
bramfarmAus*
Jan 25, 2009

I agree with last two posts.
jcann*us*
Jan 25, 2009

I didn't get it--but I think it was quite clever! I am fascinated by anagrams and will add this to my collection. (I figured "apt" meant that it would be an appropriate anagram related in some way to the first phrase.) Thanks for a good teaser!
piers*gb*
Jan 25, 2009

I agree that putting quote marks around the phrase would have made people understand that the whole phrase needs to be used. Without the quote marks I can see that some people might think that they should only make an anagram of Ivanhoe and that the rest of the phrase (by Sir Walter Scott) is just there for information. if our teacher had used quote marks around the phrase when I was a child then I would have used them here but it didn't occur to me that they would be needed.
UptheHillA*
Jan 25, 2009

avonmaAus*
Jan 25, 2009

It WAS an apt anagram, and I did get a signal from my brain that you didn't need to put "by Sir Walter Scott" there, too...unless we needed it for the anagram. Unfortunately, it was AFTER I looked at the answer. Mostly, I just worked on scrambling the letters in "Ivanhoe" to make a different word. So, I wasn't getting anywhere. I think the quotation marks around the words we were to use would have been helpful, too. Thanks for posting.



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